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How to Reduce the Risk of Meth Contamination in Your Auckland, NZ Rental Home

Meth is the common term used to describe the drug methamphetamine. The use of this drug is on the rise in New Zealand, and it’s prevalent in every part of the population; across all sectors of society. The impact that this drug can have on a rental property is serious, and there will be landlords out there who are ignorant to the fact that meth is being used or even manufactured in their property.

Signs of Meth Use in Property

There are even professionals now who are recreational meth users, so it’s impossible to expect or predict which of your tenants might bring this drug into your property. The Tenancy Tribunal has been clear that landlords who are not screening for meth in their properties are carrying substantial risk. If tenants find that there is meth contamination in the property in which they’re living, they will be entitled to compensation that may include a full refund of rent, and they can be excused from their lease. Any belongings that may be contaminated can be replaced as well. So, there is a big risk for landlords.

Meth Contamination Testing

Meth Contamination and your Auckland Rental Property Talk

The best way to reduce the risk of meth contamination as a landlord is to screen the home for meth at the beginning of every tenancy and at the end of those tenancies. The purpose of meth contamination testing is that when you hand a property over to new tenants, they know it is clear and free of meth contamination. Then, when they leave the property at the end of their lease term, if you have a positive meth test come back, those tenants can be held responsible for cleaning up the contamination.

This is just an overview of meth and how it can affect your rental property. If you have any questions about this or anything pertaining to property management in Auckland, NZ, please don’t hesitate to contact us at Walker Weir Property Management.

January 18th, 2017